Don’t miss an episode! Subscribe to our podcast:  iTunes  |  Stitcher  Spotify

On today’s podcast, I talk with Tania Silva Meléndez and Tamara Trinidad González, birth workers and Evidence Based Birth® instructors about giving birth and midwifery care in Puerto Rico.

Tania Silva Meléndez is a certified birth, postpartum, and abortion doula serving families in Puerto Rico since 2009. She’s also a certified childbirth educator and breastfeeding/chestfeeding educator and counselor. She is the general coordinator of the team of Caderamen, a nonprofit community-based organization that works towards reducing inequalities in reproductive care, and she also supports Alimentación Segura Infantil, a community-based organization born after the impacts of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 to support breastfeeding and chestfeeding families in their lactation journeys, help them relactate their children when needed. Tania is also a human rights activist and advocate in her community and part of the Observatorio de Violencia Obstétrica in Puerto Rico and Las Mingas de Aborto, an abortion doula collective that offers free support in Puerto Rico.

Tamara Trinidad González, is a community parteira/midwife, perinatal educator and herbalist born and raised in Puerto Rico. Tamara is a mother of two children who were born at home with midwives and has been actively involved in birth work for 10 years. She holds a Master of Science in midwifery with foundations in botanical medicine from Bastyr University and is a certified professional midwife. Her midwifery and herbal practice is called Semilla Creciente, Midwifery & Herbalism.

In this episode, Tania and Tamara have a very candid conversation about the realities of pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care in Puerto Rico. They speak to how Puerto Rico’s birth landscape has been negatively impacted by the island’s history of colonialism, economic crisis’, environmental changes, and changes in political power. This has culminated in a system with far too few midwives and obstetricians, as well as high surgical birth rates, low VBAC rates, high prematurity rates, and more. Both Tania and Tamara educate our listeners on these issues but also raise awareness to the community organizations who have the trust of the pregnant and postpartum families they serve and the work being done to better support the families of Puerto Rico.

Trigger Warnings: obstetric violence, colonialism, infant death, abortion, poor outcomes, maternal health deserts, gender based violence

Resources
If you are interested in joining with Tania and Tamara and volunteering your time or skills to help them reform the maternal health system in Puerto Rico, they are currently looking for volunteers with experience in law, public relations, funding, data collection, research, and writing. OR if you have resources, or access to connections that could help fund their work, please email puertoricobirthrights@gmail.com.
 
 
Read more about the history of Puerto Rico:
 
· Learn more about Caderamen, a nonprofit organization that has a service program that is called SePARE, which offers education and doula services, midwifery services and naturopathic medicine services, social workers, mental health by clicking here.

· Learn more about the Asociación de Parteras of Puerto Rico here.
· Learn more about Alimentación Segura Infantil, a community-based organization born after the impacts of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 to support breastfeeding and chestfeeding families in their lactation journeys by clicking here
· Learn more about Observatorio de Violencia Obstétrica in Puerto Rico here.
· Learn more about Las Mingas de Aborto, an abortion doula collective that offers free support in Puerto Rico here
 
Check out the work by Puerto Rican journalist Biana Graulau here: https://www.youtube.com/@BiancaGraulau/videos
 
English Transcript

Rebecca Dekker:

Hi everyone and bienvenidos. On today’s podcast, we’re going to talk with Tania Silva Meléndez and Tamara Trinidad González, birth workers and Evidence Based Birth® instructors about giving birth and midwifery care in Puerto Rico.

Welcome to the Evidence Based Birth® podcast. My name is Rebecca Dekker and I’m a nurse with my PhD and the founder of Evidence Based Birth®. Join me each week as we work together to get evidence-based information into the hands of families and professionals around the world. As a reminder, this information is not medical advice. See ebbirth.com/disclaimer for more details.

Hi everyone. My name is Rebecca Dekker, pronouns she/her, and I’ll be your host for today’s episode. Before we get started, I wanted to let you know that we will mention obstetric violence. If there are any other content or trigger warnings, they will be detailed in the show notes for this episode.

If you would like to read a transcript of this episode in Spanish, please visit the link in the show notes. Or you can watch the captions in Spanish on YouTube.

Si desea leer una transcripción de este episodio en español, visite el enlace en las notas del programa. O usted (Formal) puede ver los subtítulos en español en YouTube.

And now I’d like to introduce our honored guest. Tania Silva Meléndez, pronouns she/her, is a certified birth, postpartum, and abortion doula serving families in Puerto Rico since 2009. She’s also a certified childbirth educator and breastfeeding/chestfeeding education and counselor.

Tania supports all kinds of families with evidence based information, empathy, and respect. She hosts support groups, teaches breastfeeding and chestfeeding classes and childbirth classes to expectant parents and birth professionals both in her private practice and in the organization she works with. She is general coordinator of the team of Caderamen, a nonprofit community-based organization that works towards reducing inequalities in reproductive care, and she also supports Alimentación Segura Infantil, a community-based organization born after the impacts of Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 to support breastfeeding and chestfeeding families in their lactation journeys, help them relactate when needed. Tania is also a human rights activist and advocate in her community and part of the Observatorio de Violencia Obstétrica in Puerto Rico and Las Mingas de Aborto, an abortion doula collective that offers free support in Puerto Rico.

Tamara Trinidad González, CPM, pronouns she/her, is a community partera/midwife, perinatal educator and herbalist born and raised in Puerto Rico. Tamara is a mother of two children who were born at home with midwives and has been actively involved in birth work for 10 years. She holds a master of science and midwifery with foundations in botanical medicine from Bastyr University and is a certified professional midwife. Her midwifery and herbal practice is called Semilla Creciente, Midwifery & Herbalism.

Tamara is currently the president of the Puerto Rico Midwifery Association and part of the board of the National Association for Certified Professional Midwives and she’s very committed to educational equity and political aspects of the midwifery profession. As a professional in her community, Tamara is passionate about building connections and collaborations between midwives and other health professionals in Puerto Rico with the hope that with these better relationships and communication can build smooth transfers when needed, with the goal of facilitating the best care possible for families giving birth in Puerto Rico. Both Tania and Tamara became Evidence Based Birth® Instructors in 2021. I’m so thrilled that both Tania and Tamara are here. Welcome and bienvenidas to the Evidence Based Birth® podcast.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Thank you. We’re also very thrilled.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yes, very honored to be here finally in this space. Thank you.

Rebecca Dekker:

Yeah, and I so enjoyed meeting you both in Puerto Rico this January. It was the highlight of my year so far, and I am just so excited that our listeners get a chance to hear from you. Can you talk with our listeners about what inspired each of you to go into birth work in the first place?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Okay, I’ll start. This is Tania. When my husband and I realized that we were ready to have a baby and we wanted to quit birth control, we started researching a little bit about birth and we started getting educated. So I crossed with the documentary, The Business of Being Born, and I confirmed what I suspected that I want. I didn’t want to give birth in a hospital, so I started searching for midwives in Puerto Rico. And I remembered a friend of my brother that gave birth at home, so I called her and she gave me information about midwives in Puerto Rico.

That was around November, December, and on December, there was photographic exposition of home birth photography that coincided with the inauguration of Centro Mam, which is a community-based organization that supports reproductive process of woman, mostly birth and with midwives and doulas and all that stuff. And that December, there was going to be a doula certification. So I said, “Hmm, I’m going to do this for myself and maybe to help my friend.” And in the past I felt the calling. I just recently finished two master’s degrees in business and international business. Has nothing to do with birth, but that’s how I entered this world. Then I became a childbirth educator, and then I became a mother and a breastfeeding/chestfeeding educator afterwards.

Rebecca Dekker:

Yeah. And how many years have you been in birth work then, Tania?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

I certificated in 2009, so it’s been almost 13 years, 14 years.

Rebecca Dekker:

Wow. 13 or 14 years, that’s amazing. And Tamara, how about you? How did you get into midwifery and becoming a partera?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Well, right before my first pregnancy around 2010, 2011, I was already trying to see what I wanted to do for grad school. I had a bachelor’s degree in biology and I was working in conservation, environmental conservation and education. But I was able to go to Honduras on a journey and I was able to see medical professionals. I didn’t know any skills, taking vitals or anything, but I was able to support the team and coordinating volunteers.

Right after that trip, I started thinking, “Huh, I think I really want to try to consider pursuing something related to health.” I wasn’t sure if it was going to medical school, which a lot of my classmates in the bachelor’s degree were doing, or public health. So I think everything is just connected because midwifery, it’s public health. But then I think became pregnant and then the journey started of me looking for options and realizing that there were not a lot of options and that finding a midwife was kind of a challenge. Back then, there were only three direct-entry midwives [on the island], but I was happy that I connected with one of them because I actually thought it was an extinct profession. And my father was born at home with midwives, so it wasn’t too far away from me in terms of history and connecting with those realities and those options.

But then if I wanted to do that, I needed an OB that was willing to respect my option of midwifery care in a parallel way and respect my option of doing a home birth. So for that, I had to travel two hours back and forth each way for each appointment because I didn’t live close to that doctor. And then the long story short, after I finally was able to have my respected process at home during the births, in the midst of all the oxytocin high, I was also kind of in shock and all the images of the process and my midwife right there confirming health, being so respectful, so calm, and letting me be, I remember that I just felt a message right in my heart saying, “This should be accessible for everyone. It shouldn’t be so hard.”

I was determined, I had a good work, I had education that allowed me to do research, but it wasn’t accessible at all. I think that seed kept growing, because at first I was like, “I’m just in an oxytocin high, of course.” But then like a year after, I saw a doula course and I registered on it, and I did it and became a doula. Then two years after that, I saw the perinatal educator course, but midwifery calling was always there. And I started to getting to know all the midwifery community and seeing it grow, seeing more students that were already coursing, graduating and beginning their practices. And five years after I gave birth to my first child is when I was able to start midwifery school and yes, here I am around 12 years later, a midwife in Puerto Rico and there’s even more midwives, and it’s very exciting to see the community grow and the options grow.

Rebecca Dekker:

So when you had your first baby at home, you said there were three midwives doing home births in Puerto Rico?

Tamara Trinidad González:

There were three direct-entry midwives. There were also some nurse midwives as well that were also doing home birth, but I didn’t know that in that moment.

Rebecca Dekker:

So about a handful of midwives and nurse midwives. And do you know how many there are now on the island?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yes. There’s now 16 direct-entry midwives. 14 of us are CPMs, there’s 12 students in different schools for direct-entry midwifery programs, and there’s about 13 nurse midwives.

Rebecca Dekker:

Wow.

Tamara Trinidad González:

I’m not sure how many of them are currently in practice, but there’s also many of them, like probably half of them are in practice.

Rebecca Dekker:

So you were living through hopefully a rejuvenation of midwifery in Puerto Rico. You’re seeing it happen.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yeah. Yeah. We’re seeing it all 3D.

Rebecca Dekker:

I know that’s encouraging news, but I also have learned from you that the birth environment for families and birth workers can be very difficult and challenging. Can you talk to us about birth in Puerto Rico? What is the birth rate? How easy is it to access care from an obstetrician or midwife, and what’s the culture of birth there in the hospitals?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Okay, so this is Tania again. This is like a summary of the birth scenery in Puerto Rico. When I started doula-ing, around 42,000 babies were born each year. Today, there’s been a significant decrease, around 19,000 babies are being born every year.

Rebecca Dekker:

So your birth rate has been decreased by half?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yes, yes. And it has to do with migration because of the economic crisis in Puerto Rico and all the disasters, the hurricanes, the earthquakes, the government, the imposition of the Junta de Control Fiscal, I think we’re going to talk about that, the colonial stuff in Puerto Rico, and also because of Zika. When Zika was happening, the Zika virus.

Rebecca Dekker:

Oh, the Zika virus, yes.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

There was a big campaign on birth control. So the government was offering free birth control, long-term birth control with intrauterine devices being inserted for free for women. So that also affected natality in Puerto Rico. Besides the natality being dropped in terms of outcomes, we have a very high Cesarean rate, one of the highest in the world and in the United States, and I’m talking about the United States context because we’re a colony of the United States. So in 2021, we had 49.6% of Cesarean rate.

Rebecca Dekker:

So one half?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Uh-huh. It’s been like that since I started doing birth work. Around the 40-somethings, 46, 47, 46, 48, 49. There’s a very low rate of VBAC, around 1%. There’s a very high prematurity rate and low birth weight both in 2021 were 12%. One of the highest in the United States also. So that’s the scenery here.

In terms of obstetrician, of course, also because of the crisis, there’s been a lot of fleeing of medical doctors in all areas of health, but also obstetricians. So we can say that maybe around 100 obstetricians take care of those 20,000 births. It’s an access problem. When we talk about obstetric violence, we know that it’s not only personal, it’s violent, but it’s a systemic problem really, because how can 100 doctors take care of 19,000 births a year? You know?

So yeah, in terms of how open the system is to these type of birth workers, midwives, and doulas, in terms, I’m going to talk about doulas and maybe Tamara can talk about the midwives. Since we are growing like midwives, when I started, there wasn’t as many doulas, and every year, maybe 200 – 300 women or people get certified as doulas. So we are more now, and since we are more, doctors and hospitals are getting more used to work with us. Some are super open, are super cool, and understand the benefit of having us in their team, but some are still hesitant about the work that we do. They don’t even understand properly what a doula does. Sometimes I come to the hospital with a client, and they ask me how dilated she is… “I’m sorry doctor, I don’t do clinical stuff.” I can tell by her face, her contractions, her breathing, she might be in a labor around this, around that, but they don’t even understand our scope of practice.

But yeah, they’re more open now, and the restrictions on the pandemic have taken us back again a couple of years back in terms of access and birth rights violations. But yeah, we hope that changes.

Tamara Trinidad González:

I agree that seeing an increase in doula and midwives in the past decade sounds very encouraging and I’m sure it has made a huge difference in a lot of families, but there’s so much more that needs to be done and that needs to change, especially in the mentality of those that hold power. Because there’s a lot of power dynamics that happen in the birth scenario, not only in the birth scenario, from the moment they find out, any woman or pregnant person when they found out they have a positive pregnancy test and they’re trying to explore what are their options moving forward.

Midwifery and doula is not something that they immediately find out if they don’t know about it. Some people find out very late and they are feeling discouraged of like, “Why didn’t I know about this earlier on?” So we’re doing educating since the beginning is a very important piece of the puzzle right there.

Midwifery care here, it’s just very different to how it works in other states and territories because one of the big differences is that the Department of Health still doesn’t consider us healthcare workers because we’re still not licensed here. We still don’t have a regulation. Well, we don’t have it right now. There used to be one, and then midwifery language was erased from that regulation. So it’s been then like that for about, well…

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Since the ’40s.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Since the ’40s, which is kind of around the corner, the 100th anniversary, right?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Moved birth from the home and the midwife care to the hospital. The midwife language in the Health Department of Puerto Rico was erased as midwives were erased from the-

Rebecca Dekker:

They literally tried to erase midwives.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yeah, but it hasn’t stopped. The profession has continued. How it works is that in order for people to access their labs and their ultrasounds, they also need medical care. But ideally, it could be a parallel work where the midwife and the doctor can discuss and communicate between each other. And that’s how some of the midwives have been able to do it. I have been able to do that with some doctors, but again, it’s only a handful of doctors that are open to this. There are some solutions, that we’re going to propose later on, of how to change this.

In Washington state, where I studied or I grew up as a midwife, as a baby midwife, what I saw was very different because we were the primary care provider. As soon as the person found out they were pregnant, they could automatically choose an OB or a midwife. And then if they chose a midwife, they still had three options: a midwife in the hospital, a midwife in a birth center, or a midwife at home. So there’s a huge difference there. We are definitely needing to move forward because there is not a lot of understanding and a lot of the aggressive comments towards the family that choose midwifery care and home births come from providers that they don’t have all the information. So there’s a lot of misconceptions, especially if a misconception is held by the older OBs and they’re teaching younger OBs and students, the information may be passed in ways that are not accurate and then that just gives a lot of space to bias and education can absolutely change that, and that’s where we’re going to move to.

Rebecca Dekker:

So in order to have midwifery care, you have to have an OB who agrees to be providing the backup or the parallel care, to order any lab tests, to help you get an ultrasound, or if you need any medications during pregnancy or labor. So that kind of limits the midwives and the parents because there’s very few doctors who will agree to do that. And then I imagine if a client needs to transfer to the hospital, which happens, will always be happening at some point, I imagine you face a difficult circumstance when you bring them to the hospital. Is that correct?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Absolutely. Especially because even if we have a good communication with the doctor, the doctor is also employed by the hospital, so there’s also so much they can do. They’re also oppressed by the system and the dynamics that are happening there. So even if a doctor knows, “Oh, I am transferring this client because she says she’s tried all of the things, all of the comfort measures, and she’s very ready for pain medication, or she wants to try something else.” Even if it’s not an emergency and it’s just a stable mom that wants other option? If I tell the doctor, and the doctor knows, but I arrive there and the doctor is not there yet, then how do I access the other personnel that are going to receive us if they don’t even answer the phone? It’s like beginning from zero.

And then the charting. Midwives here, we chart in the same language, the same acronyms are used for charting the same SOAP notes and even longer SOAP notes. And we have electronic charting, some do paper charting, depending. But the thing is that… that is a very powerful tool that could be used for continuity of care and communication, because there’s no space for thinking that we’re transferring an unstable mom, or if we are transferring someone that needs maybe an emergency process, let’s just avoid the questions of how many pregnancies you’ve had in the past if what we’re going for is like a continuous monitoring or something else.

But it’s a tool that’s many times it’s just not accepted. They don’t want to read it. I think communication is just very powerful and not being afraid. I have had sort of good experiences just advocating for families and standing strong and speaking my truth. “No, this is my training, this is the charting, what email can I send it to?” And then little by little, I see the layers of resistance opening up, but it takes time and it really depends who’s receiving us. And it still takes time away from the family. It shouldn’t be like a battle and a struggle, and it is a huge challenge that ultimately families are the ones that are affected, right?

Rebecca Dekker:

Right. And they’re the ones trying to escape a system that gives them a 50% chance of having a Cesarean and also a high likelihood of experiencing potential abuse during the birthing process. And then when they do need that extra medical help, these are the kinds of barriers they face.

Can you talk a little bit about what impact colonization continues to have on families and birth workers in Puerto Rico?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yes. Well, I would like to explain a little bit about our status, because not every person know where we stand. Puerto Rico, since 1917, well, we became a colony of the United States in 1898 after the Spain-American War. We were prized from Spain to the United States, and in 1917, they gave Puerto Ricans U.S. citizenships. Every baby born in Puerto Rico became a U.S. citizen at the same time that our men were sent to the World War I for the United States Army.

Colonization has limited the autonomy of our nation. Everything that we consume, about 85% that we consume in Puerto Rico is imported from or through the United States. Sometimes if it’s an international product or service, paying double taxes because of this loss, and that’s not even talking about the colonized mind. What Tamara was talking earlier about the power struggle and this mentality that you don’t question authority, you have to be subjected to whatever is imposed… is a little bit intrinsic in our ways of being and acting and accepting and doing. So that’s a little bit on what we are. We are a commonwealth of the United States, but what we are is a colony in the 21st century.

Tamara Trinidad González:

We are a democracy with a lot of dictatorship.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Exactly. As early as 2016, the U.S. Congress imposed a fiscal board to Puerto Rico. It’s a board of seven mostly white people that are not necessarily Puerto Ricans. They are not Puerto Ricans. I think maybe there’s one Puerto Rican now. They were appointed to, it’s by a law that it’s called the Puerto Rico Oversight Management and Economic Stability Act.

Tamara Trinidad González:

PROMESA.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

PROMESA in Spanish. So it was established in 2016 as a financial oversight board in order to restructure our debt, and expedite procedures for approving critical infrastructure projects in order to combat the Puerto Rico and government debt crisis. But that imposition, first of all, the people that is governing us wasn’t elected by Puerto Ricans, was imposed by the U.S. Congress, and it’s going to be governing us until 2026. We still have our governor, we still have our House of Representatives, the Senate, but no matter what they say, if the Junta says “No, this is not happening,” they overrule it.

This austerity plan has deeply cut into Puerto Rico’s public service budget, including cuts to healthcare, pensions and education in order to repay credit. So that’s super colonial and we are seeing the impacts of it. This morning, I was telling Tamara, this morning the cover of the main newspaper in Puerto Rico, El Nuevo Día, was exposing that there’s a crisis with NICUs in Puerto Rico. Neonatal intensive care unit. So in the last year, about five NICUs have closed in Puerto Rico. The health crisis is already here. We have the experience that when our clients give birth, they cannot find a pediatrician to see their babies as soon as they should be seen. Colonialism is really affecting us in all aspects of our lives.

Rebecca Dekker:

Right, education, healthcare work, what prices you pay for things, what control you have. And also it’s worth mentioning that it’s supposedly democracy, but you have no representation in the U.S. Congress. So really no say-

Tania Silva Meléndez:

And we cannot vote for the president, either.

Rebecca Dekker:

Right. You mentioned the effect on NICUs, and I know when we talked together in person, you talked about gentrification. Can you mention that a little bit?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yes. A couple of years ago, there was a law that was created, a couple of laws created in order to incentivize American investment in Puerto Rico where they offered investors to come to Puerto Rico, invest, and they didn’t have to pay any taxes on any capital gain. So as you may imagine, a lot of rich investors come to Puerto Rico, buy land, buy property, establish AirBnBs, and Puerto Ricans have no access. There’s a problem in terms of home access. I have a friend that she, her husband, and her three kids are living in a studio because they cannot find an affordable house.

And it’s a problem that is happening all over the island. On the coasts where the beaches are, in the centers of the island, everywhere. So gentrification is a major problem. I was reading yesterday about medical tourism and how these companies are establishing like a medical concierge service where rich person can pay a membership of let’s say $5,000 a year and this company will book you appointments without waiting. So me, that I’m a Puerto Rican with no economic access if I need some, let’s say, I don’t know, dermatologic care, I have to wait five, six months for an appointment. And that’s in all services. That happens with us, especially for specialist.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yeah. Even dental work.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Dental work, whatever. Whatever.

Tamara Trinidad González:

And it’s also an environmental crisis. It amplifies the health issue because one of our battles, environmental battles, is the access to our beaches, which is the access needs to be public according to the laws, but for the rich people and the rich investors, even though the Department of Natural Resources are giving out permits, because they can pay more for the permits and they’re able to build in the-

Tania Silva Meléndez:

fences and…

Tamara Trinidad González:

And even in the maritime zone, prohibiting the access to the locals and just creating other problems as well. There is many ways that colonialism is affecting us. And it’s just a chain, a chain reaction that we just keep seeing it unfold in our eyes because even if we’re involved in birth work, we’re also aware of everything else. Because again, birth work is public health and it’s also a lot of political work as well.

Rebecca Dekker:

And you’re also trying to live and raise your families.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yeah, exactly. The crisis.

Tamara Trinidad González:

The day in day.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

The struggles.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yes. It’s like, and there’s a lot going on and it feels, we can feel the heaviness. And really, I think it hurts us a lot when we see how families are affected by all of it. We feel frustration when we see a family that finally went through all the courses and education, but at the end of the day, weren’t able to speak up at the hospital. Because all the years of colonialism have impacted them in such a way that some are, they just have so many intersections that have oppressed them that it’s just very hard. Being able to go in the hospitals with them as a second companion, it’s very important because even the pandemic was used as an excuse to take this right away from the families.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Still is. Everything is open, everything is-

Rebecca Dekker:

Right. Nobody’s wearing masks, yeah. It’s open. Except they’re still limiting support in labor and delivery.

And I also want to say, I was really impacted by some videos from a journalist in Puerto Rico named Bianca Graulau.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Graulau, uh-huh.

Rebecca Dekker:

Yeah. Some amazing videos about gentrification and just really on the ground reporting that’s incredible. So I encourage people to check out her work and we’ll link to that in the show notes.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

I was going to say that I think that one of the videos she did was about what is happening in Hawaii, and that’s where we’re going. That’s where Puerto Rico is going. People cannot afford homes. People are living in tents. It’s terrible. It’s terrible.

Rebecca Dekker:

What are some solutions you’ve tried to implement, or the birth community has tried to implement that seem to be helping families?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Evidence Based Birth®’s course!

Tania Silva Meléndez:

That’s one. Unfortunately, we cannot expect the government, nor the health department, nor the authorities that are obliged to take these matters into their hands. We cannot wait for them. It’s been, in my experience, I’ve been doing this work for 13, 14 years, and it’s so slow the changes, and so when something starts to change, then the pandemic, everything goes backward. I think that the only hope right now that I can really trust is community work. And it’s what has made a difference to some families.

I am a general coordinator of a nonprofit organization that is called Caderamen, and it has a program, a service program that is called SePARE, which offer education and doula services, midwifery services and naturopathic medicine services, social workers, mental health. We’ve seen in comparison to the numbers that we were mentioning, outcomes in Puerto Rico, we see how these support and interdisciplinary services for families really make a difference in the health outcomes and in the experience of this family. I would say that more work from the ground is what’s needed. We need to unite and seeing how from the community to the community we can support the families because it seems it’s not a priority of our government.

Tamara Trinidad González:

This is Tamara here. I wanted to add to that. Absolutely community work, it’s so way to go. And the force in which the community is putting the trust in because they are feeling respected, they’re feeling that they are being heard and they’re learning.

Social media and that boom is also a great tool that people from the younger generations, maybe they won’t be reading a very long article, but educational material that’s very dynamic, they are very drawn to that and it’s easier to see themselves and see, “Oh, these families from Puerto Rico are accessing this type of health.” Either home births or either they could even see images of hospital births where they’re able to move freely and they have support and there’s other things going on. So we’re very visual, so that helps as well.

And another thing that has been in conversation fairly recently is joining forces from different organizations and professionals and putting the situation in the center, the problem at the center to see how we can just find solutions from all the different resources and perspectives. Moving towards integration or some sort of coalition, just help us be stronger in the search of solutions, could continue making a huge difference.

All the midwives are just very clear that we’re ready to create a Puerto Rico license of midwifery, and we’re shaping up to how that would look. It can focus on the right of midwives to work in our scope of practice and how we have been trained and how we are valued in other parts of the world, but also it needs to be respecting the rights of the family to choose.

Rebecca Dekker:

Right.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Another thing is that old obstetricians, their mindsets are difficult to change. So when we were talking to you on January here in Puerto Rico, we see that part of the solution, it’s working with younger generations, with the doctors that are being formed right now so that our hope, people that really want to make a difference in births in Puerto Rico.

Rebecca Dekker:

So groundwork from the community and growing the number of doulas and midwives and then finding unity are solutions you’re working on. And you mentioned to me when we met in person that you saw some recent legislative success. I know you have doubts about the government, but…tell our listeners.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Okay, yes. First, it’s important that the Supreme Court of Puerto Rico made a ruling on a case of obstetric violence where a baby died [Flores v. Ryder Hospital]. In a summary, this doctor induced a mother with 36 weeks because he was going on vacation on her due date. The baby, of course, was born premature with a lot of complications, and 12 days later she died. So the family sued, the Supreme Court ruled that both the doctor and the hospital were responsible of the death of the baby. It’s the first time that the Supreme Court or any legal authority talked about obstetric violence and put a name on it.

In Latin America, some other countries have already legislation about obstetric violence. Here in Puerto Rico there’s a Senate bill, 454, that was proposed in June 2021. The Senate approved it, but still on the House to be approved. So we’ll see what happens with that. It’s important that this kind of behavior is named from the government, is named and something is proposed in order to deal with this gender violence issue.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Okay. Tamara here. Another legislative success is that in February 2021, around that date, a little bit earlier, a Senate bill was proposed to declare May 5th of every year, which is celebrated in every part of the world as the International Day of the Midwife, so what it was proposed is to declare a law in Puerto Rico that everyone, every sphere in the government, including the Department of Education and the Department of Health and everyone in the community, needs to know about Midwifery Day. So as recent as January of this year, and I think it was like a few days after before you arrived, it was finally declared a law. So it kind of went through all the steps in the government to finally become a law.

And although it’s been known for decades by the World Health Organization and the United Nations, it’s just very important that it’s now a law here and we believe that this will just open space to continue educating communities. And we hope that this law is just a step forward and a link so that midwifery care is finally recognized in Puerto Rico and reincorporated into the health services. And to celebrate this year, we are already planning an activity in a public plaza in Rio Grande, which is one of our municipalities. And that major just offered the plaza for free and it’s offering a lot of support so that we can just receive all the public and just talk about midwifery history and have artisans and have music and just make a public pueblo party.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Celebration, yes.

Tamara Trinidad González:

A celebration and just continue raising awareness.

Rebecca Dekker:

And that was what I was thinking of… Obviously the obstetric violence ruling is very important, like you said.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yeah, because maybe hospitals will be more aware of they really have to do something about it. It’s not only the doctor’s fault. You have to have protocols, you have to supervise how things are work, that you’re following guidelines, et cetera, et cetera.

Rebecca Dekker:

Yeah, and the fact that they named obstetric violence and talked about it, and then in a similar time span, also naming midwives as a solution and requiring education basically to honor midwives is an important step towards hopefully moving forward. And I know you both are looking towards and working towards future legislation too, so that the midwives can practice with that.

I know it’s a difficult subject because in some places, midwives don’t necessarily want regulation, but if you’re also not recognized as a legitimate provider, it makes it very hard for you to get resources, access, respect.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

And it makes it harder for families too, because not everyone can afford a home birth.

Rebecca Dekker:

Right. If you could be recognized as a healthcare provider than there would be other ways for them to pay for your services as well. Yeah.

What other goals do you have for the future or any projects coming up?

Tamara Trinidad González:

I would love this year that we can just go into hospitals and into universities and just talk to professionals to people who are already professionals in the birth setting and to professionals that are in just developing, the ones that are in uterus. That when you mean, yes.

Rebecca Dekker:

[Laughs] The baby professionals or healthcare workers.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yes.

Rebecca Dekker:

Yeah. So what were your plans? You talked about that in person. So what are you planning this year for that?

Tamara Trinidad González:

So we have reached out to people we know, other professionals we know that are either professors in universities. There’s two professionals, one is a family doctor and the other one is a nurse. She’s a nurse midwife, but she teaches specifically to general nursing students at a university. So they’re knocking on their doors because they also have the people they need to ask for that to happen.

But absolutely finding out ways, and I was in Colombia last week and talking to traditional midwives and how they collaborate so beautifully with female OBs and the perinatal mental health professionals, and they created a curriculum that was presented to a university for continuing education. And I just fell in love with that idea. I just see it completely possible, and it may be a way of making it more structured and also incentivized further training.

Rebecca Dekker:

Tania, what about you? What projects do you have in mind this year?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

We were talking about this, about training professionals last February at Caderamen Health Birth Summit and here in Puerto Rico. And some of the speakers were professors from medical students and obstetric residency. So this doctor, after we were in the same panel and after the presentation, she came to me and at least she told me that she’s very interested in working together. So that’s another entering path in order to access the medical school of the University of Puerto Rico, which is one of the most important medical schools in Puerto Rico. And we’re hoping that we can arrange something with her so that we can get to the students and also to them. So that in terms of education and doing something inside the system.

Personally, I guess, well, keep doing the work that we’re doing and prevent burnout because this is a very consuming work, the one that we do.

Tamara Trinidad González:

I wanted to add to that. Thank you for mentioning that. That’s just very important while we continue feeling the stress in our body. But I wanted to add, in part of educating, I remember when I was a midwifery student, one of the thesis projects that I fell in love with came from a midwifery student that she used to be an EMT before becoming a midwife when she was in that same state, in that same community where the university was. So it was very amazing to see how she was, she just had an amazing relationship with EMTs. So she was able to put up a curriculum because she was able to talk to the EMTs and tell them and ask them, “So when midwives call you for a transfer, what questions do you have?” The questions that they had was like, “Why do they ask us to put the mother in a certain position instead of this one? How does that affect what we know about resuscitation on newborn and giving those first steps is this, but how do you guys do it?”

With all that conversation, a beautiful curriculum and a very powerful one was able to put up together. So after that, they were able to go to every EMT unit and just teach them about what happens when a midwife calls you. In a birth center or in a home birth, what do we need? And that was very powerful because that was implemented a few years before I was finishing my program and what I saw, and for midwives, it was like, oh, we’re seeing the change. But I was completely impressed by this, that if we called 911 and EMTs arrived, it was a very humble moment of what do you need? It was the specific questions so that it didn’t become a battle. It was like, oh, no, they wanted to help and they wanted to do exactly what we needed so that there wasn’t any time lost in the moment.

So here, we need to do a lot of work because when we need a transfer for different reasons, simple things like what is the oxygen level that needs to be put becomes a fight, becomes a disagreement. And that is time-sensitive. That is a matter of life. Or other skills that need to be performed. So I think that putting together a curriculum that also can just be brought up together and help EMTs and see them as part of the team and honor their skills, but help them understand our perspectives and that we can understand their perspectives and their struggles as well, could be very powerful.

Rebecca Dekker:

I love how both of you have a passion for bringing people together. It’s one thing I’ve seen, you work together, you hold each other up and support one another, and you bring other birth workers and you have a passion for bringing students and EMTs and families and everybody working towards a common goal. So it’s very beautiful.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Thank you.

Tamara Trinidad González:

There’s no other way.

Rebecca Dekker:

So how can people support and follow your work for our listeners who are impacted by your conversation?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Well, I wanted to invite listeners to check out SePARE, or SePARE, we are in the different Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. SePARE, you can check us out and follow our work from the organization that I work with, because even though I still have my private clients, the organization takes most of my time, so I am mostly devoted to that. You can also follow the Asociación de Parteras of Puerto Rico (@asociaciondeparteraspr). You want to tell more, Tamara?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Yeah. We’re going to send these links so that they’re easier to link on. But yeah, the Midwifery Association of Puerto Rico, although I also have my private practice, this currently the president of the association, and it is a space that we’re organizing to amplify the voices and the rights of the midwives and the families. We’re going to be putting up a lot of updates in the next few months of how to support midwifery work and towards advancing the profession.

This also includes that we need a lot of fundraising because there’s going to be a lot of services that we’re going to need to hire in order to do the work that needs to be done. So I would say just keep checking the pages so that you can find all the updates and you could also email us at appr2021@gmail.com, English or Spanish.

Rebecca Dekker:

And we’ll make sure to have all the links easy to click on, everything you send us that, that you want us to share. Tania and Tamara, thank you so much for coming on the podcast. Thank you for everything that you’re doing in Puerto Rico, and we honor and appreciate you both.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Thank you.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Thank you so much for all the work you’ve also been doing, because you’ve been paving a way for everyone in every part of the world, and that is very crucial and needed.

Rebecca Dekker:

We’re doing it together.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Yes, absolutely.

Rebecca Dekker:

Thanks everyone for listening to this very important episode with Tania and Tamara. If you are interested in joining with them and volunteering your time or skills to help them reform the maternal health system in Puerto Rico, they are currently looking for volunteers with experience in law, public relations, funding, data collection, research, and writing. OR if you have resources, or access to connections that could help fund their work, please email puertoricobirthrights@gmail.com. Also, if much of this information was new to you, I strongly recommend checking out a book or two from your local library about the history of Puerto Rico or of U.S. colonization. Two introductory books that I recommend include “How to hide an empire” by Daniel Immerwahr, and “Puerto Rico: What everyone needs to know” by Jorge Duany.

Today’s podcast was brought to you by the Evidence Based Birth® professional membership. The free articles and podcasts we provide to the public are supported by our professional membership program at Evidence Based Birth®. Our members are professional in the childbirth field who are committed to being change agents in their community.

En Español

Partería y Parto en Puerto Rico con las Instructoras de EBB Tania Silva Meléndez y Tamara Trinidad González

Rebeca Dekker:

Hola a todas las personas oyentes y bienvenidas. En el podcast de hoy, vamos a hablar con Tania Silva Meléndez y Tamara Trinidad González, trabajadoras de parto e instructoras de Parto Basado en Evidencia® sobre el parto y la atención de partería en Puerto Rico.

Bienvenido al podcast del parto y nacimiento basado en la evidencia. Mi nombre es Rebecca Dekker, soy enfermera con doctorado y fundadora de Evidence Based Birth. Únase a mí cada semana mientras trabajamos en conjunto para llevar información basada en evidencia a familias y profesionales de todo el mundo. Como recordatorio, esta información no es un consejo médico. Consulte ebbirth.com/disclaimer para obtener más detalles.

Hola a todas y todos. Mi nombre es Rebecca Dekker, mi pronombre es ella, y seré su presentadora para el episodio de hoy. Antes de comenzar, quería informarles que mencionaremos la violencia obstétrica. Si hay algún otro contenido o advertencias desencadenantes, se detallarán en las notas del programa para este episodio.

Si desea leer una transcripción de este episodio en español, visite el enlace en las notas del programa. O puede ver los subtítulos en español en YouTube.

Y ahora me gustaría presentarles a nuestras invitadas de honor. 

Tania Silva Meléndez, pronombre ella, es una doula certificada en parto, posparto y aborto que atiende a familias en Puerto Rico desde 2009. También es educadora certificada en parto y educación y consejera en lactancia materna. Tania apoya a todo tipo de familias con información basada en evidencia, empatía y respeto. Organiza grupos de apoyo, imparte clases de lactancia y clases de parto para futuros padres y profesionales del parto, tanto en su práctica privada como en la organización con la que trabaja. Es coordinadora general del equipo de Caderamen, una organización de base comunitaria sin fines de lucro que trabaja para reducir las desigualdades en el cuidado reproductivo, y también apoya a ASÍ (Alimentación Segura Infantil), una organización de base comunitaria que nació tras los impactos de los huracanes Irma y María en 2017 para apoyar a las familias que amamantan en sus travesías de lactancia, ayudando a relactar cuando sea necesario.

Tamara Trinidad González, pronombre Ella es una partera comunitaria, educadora perinatal y herbóloga nacida y criada en Puerto Rico. Tamara es madre de un niño y una niña que nacieron en casa con parteras y ha estado involucrada activamente en el trabajo de parto durante 11 años. Tiene una maestría en ciencias de partería con fundamentos en medicina botánica de la Universidad de Bastyr y es una partera profesional certificada. Su práctica de partería y herbología se llama Semilla Creciente, Midwifery & Herbalism.

Tamara es actualmente la presidenta de la Asociación de Partería de Puerto Rico y parte de la junta de la Asociación Nacional de Parteras Profesionales Certificadas y está muy comprometida con la equidad educativa y los aspectos políticos de la profesión de partera. Como profesional en su comunidad, a Tamara le apasiona establecer conexiones y colaboraciones entre las parteras y otros profesionales de la salud en Puerto Rico con la esperanza de que con estas mejores relaciones y comunicación se puedan generar transferencias fluidas cuando sea necesario, con el objetivo de facilitar la mejor atención posible. para familias que dan a luz en Puerto Rico. Tanto Tania como Tamara se convirtieron en instructoras de Evidence Based Birth en 2021. Estoy muy emocionada de que tanto Tania como Tamara estén aquí. Bienvenidas al podcast de Evidence Based Birth. 

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Gracias. También estamos muy emocionadas.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí, muy honrada de estar aquí finalmente en este espacio. Gracias.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sí, y disfruté mucho conocerlas a ambas en Puerto Rico este pasado mes de enero. Fue lo más destacado de mi año hasta ahora, y estoy muy emocionada de que nuestras personas oyentes tengan la oportunidad de saber de ustedes. ¿Pueden hablar con nuestros oyentes sobre lo que inspiró a cada una de ustedes a dedicarse al trabajo de nacimiento en primer lugar?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Está bien, voy a empezar. Soy Tania. Cuando mi esposo y yo nos dimos cuenta de que estábamos listos para tener un bebé y queríamos dejar los anticonceptivos, comenzamos a investigar un poco sobre el nacimiento y comenzamos a educarnos. Entonces me crucé con el documental El negocio de nacer y confirmé lo que sospechaba que quería. No quería dar a luz en un hospital, así que empecé a buscar parteras en Puerto Rico. Y me acordé de una amiga de mi hermano que dio a luz en su casa, entonces la llamé y me dio información sobre parteras en Puerto Rico.

Eso fue alrededor de noviembre, diciembre y en diciembre hubo una exposición fotográfica de partos domiciliarios que coincidió con la inauguración del Centro Mam, que es una organización comunitaria que apoya el proceso reproductivo de la mujer, principalmente el parto y con parteras y doulas y todas esas cosas Y ese diciembre iba a haber una certificación de doula. Así que dije: “Hmm, voy a hacer esto por mí misma y tal vez para ayudar a mi amiga”. Y sentí el llamado. Yo recién había terminado dos maestrías en negocios y negocios internacionales. No tiene nada que ver con el nacimiento, pero así fue como entré en este mundo. Luego me convertí en educadora de parto, y luego me convertí en madre y en educadora de lactancia humana después.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sí. ¿Y cuántos años llevas entonces en el parto, Tania?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Me certifiqué en 2009, así que han pasado casi 13 años, 14 años.

Rebeca Dekker:

Guau. 13 o 14 años, eso es increíble. Y Tamara, ¿y tú? ¿Cómo llegaste a la partería y te convertiste en partera?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Bueno, justo antes de mi primer embarazo alrededor de 2010, 2011, ya estaba tratando de ver qué quería hacer para escuela graduada/maestría. Tenía un Bachillerato en biología y trabajaba en conservación ambiental y educación. Pero pude ir a Honduras en un viaje y pude ver profesionales médicos. No poseía ninguna destreza como tomar signos vitales ni nada, pero en mi rol pude apoyar al equipo y coordinar a los voluntarios.

Inmediatamente después de ese viaje, comencé a pensar: “Eh, creo que realmente quiero intentar considerar dedicarme a algo relacionado con la salud”. No estaba segura si iba a la facultad de medicina, que habían muchos de mis compañeros y compañeras de Bachillerato, o si iría a salud pública. Así que creo que todo está conectado porque la partería es salud pública. En ese entonces quedé embarazada y luego comenzó mi travesía en la que busqué opciones y me di cuenta de que no había muchas opciones y que encontrar una partera era una especie de desafío. En ese entonces, solo había tres parteras de entrada directa [en la isla], pero estaba feliz de haberme conectado con una de ellas porque en realidad pensé que era una profesión extinta. Y mi padre nació en casa con parteras,

Pero entonces, si yo quería hacer eso, necesitaba un obstetra que estuviera dispuesto a respetar mi decisión de cuidado de partería de manera paralela y respetar mi opción de dar a luz en casa. Entonces, para eso, tenía que viajar dos horas de ida y vuelta para cada cita porque no vivía cerca de ese médico. Y luego, para resumir, una vez finalmente pude tener mi proceso respetado en casa durante el parto, en medio de todo el arrope de oxitocina, también estaba un poco en estado de shock y todas las imágenes del proceso y mi partera estaban ahí confirmando salud, siendo tan respetuosa, tan tranquila y dejándome ser, recuerdo que solo sentí un mensaje en mi corazón que decía: “Esto debería ser accesible para todas las familias. No debería ser tan difícil”.

Yo lo logré porque estaba decidida, tenía un buen trabajo, tenía una educación que me permitía investigar, pero la partería no era nada accesible. Creo que esa semilla siguió creciendo, porque al principio pensé: “Estoy en un nivel alto de oxitocina, por supuesto”. Pero luego, como un año después, vi un curso de doula y me registré en él, lo hice y me convertí en doula. Luego, dos años después de eso, vi el curso de educadora perinatal, pero la vocación de partera siempre estuvo ahí. Y comencé a conocer a toda la comunidad de partería y verla crecer, viendo más estudiantes que ya estaban cursando, egresando y comenzando sus prácticas. Y cinco años después de que di a luz a mi primer hijo es cuando pude entrar a la escuela de partería y sí, aquí estoy como 12 años después, una partera en Puerto Rico y hay aún más parteras,

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, cuando tuviste tu primer bebé en casa, ¿dijiste que había tres parteras atendiendo partos en casa en Puerto Rico?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Había tres parteras de entrada directa. También había algunas enfermeras parteras que también estaban atendiendo partos en casa, pero yo no lo sabía en ese momento.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, sobre un puñado de parteras y enfermeras parteras. ¿Y sabes cuántos hay ahora en la isla?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí. Ahora hay 16 parteras de entrada directa. 14 de nosotras somos CPM, hay 12 estudiantes en diferentes escuelas para programas de partería de entrada directa y hay alrededor de 13 enfermeras parteras.

Rebeca Dekker:

Guau.

Tamara Trinidad González:

No estoy segura de cuántas de ellas están actualmente en práctica, pero también hay muchas de ellas, como probablemente la mitad de ellas están en práctica.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, con suerte, estan viviendo un renacer de la partería en Puerto Rico. Estás viendo que sucede.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí. Sí. Lo estamos viendo todo en 3D.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sé que son noticias alentadoras, pero también aprendí de ustedes que el entorno de parto para las familias y las trabajadoras de parto puede ser muy difícil y desafiante. ¿Puede hablarnos sobre el parto en Puerto Rico? ¿Cuál es la tasa de natalidad? ¿Qué tan fácil es acceder a la atención de un obstetra o una partera y cuál es la cultura del parto en los hospitales?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Bien, esta es Tania otra vez. Esto es como un resumen del escenario del parto en Puerto Rico. Cuando comencé a ser doula, nacían alrededor de 42,000 bebés cada año. Hoy en día, ha habido una disminución significativa, alrededor de 19,000 bebés nacen cada año.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, ¿su tasa de natalidad se ha reducido a la mitad?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Sí Sí. Y tiene que ver con la migración por la crisis económica de Puerto Rico y todos los desastres, los huracanes, los terremotos, el gobierno, la imposición de la Junta de Control Fiscal, creo que vamos a hablar de eso, los asuntos coloniales en Puerto Rico, y también por el Zika. Cuando Zika estaba sucediendo, el virus Zika.

Rebeca Dekker:

Oh, el virus Zika, sí.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Hubo una gran campaña sobre el control de la natalidad. Entonces, el gobierno estaba ofreciendo control de la natalidad gratuito, control de la natalidad a largo plazo con dispositivos intrauterinos insertados de forma gratuita para las mujeres. Entonces eso también afectó la natalidad en Puerto Rico. Además de la caída de la natalidad en términos de resultados, tenemos una tasa de cesáreas muy alta, una de las más altas del mundo y de los Estados Unidos, y estoy hablando del contexto de los Estados Unidos porque somos una colonia de los Estados Unidos. Entonces, en 2021, tuvimos una tasa de cesáreas del 49,6 %.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces la mitad?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

UH Huh. Ha sido así desde que comencé a trabajar en el parto. Alrededor de los 40 y tantos, 46, 47, 46, 48, 49. Hay una tasa muy baja de VBAC, alrededor del 1%. Hay una tasa muy alta de prematuridad y bajo peso al nacer, ambas en 2021 fueron del 12%. Uno de los más altos en los Estados Unidos también. Así que ese es el panorama aquí.

En cuanto a obstetras, claro, también por la crisis, ha habido mucha salida de médicos en todas las áreas de la salud, pero también obstetras. Entonces podemos decir que tal vez alrededor de 100 obstetras atienden esos 20,000 nacimientos. Es un problema de acceso. Cuando hablamos de violencia obstétrica, sabemos que no solo es personal, es violenta, sino que es un problema sistémico realmente, porque ¿cómo 100 médicos pueden atender 19,000 partos al año? ¿Sabes?

Así que sí, en términos de qué tan abierto es el sistema para este tipo de parteras, parteras y doulas, voy a hablar sobre las doulas y tal vez Tamara pueda hablar sobre las parteras. Así como estamos creciendo como parteras, también cuando comencé, no había tantas doulas, y cada año, tal vez 200 a 300 mujeres o personas se certifican como doulas. Así que ahora somos más, y como somos más, los médicos y hospitales se están acostumbrando más a trabajar con nosotras. Algunos son súper abiertos, son súper geniales y entienden el beneficio de tenernos en su equipo, pero algunos todavía dudan sobre el trabajo que hacemos. Ni siquiera entienden bien lo que hace una doula. A veces llego al hospital con una clienta y me preguntan qué tan dilatada está… “Lo siento doctor, no hago trabajo clínico”. Puedo decir por su cara, sus contracciones,

Pero sí, ahora están más abiertos, y las restricciones de la pandemia nos han hecho retroceder un par de años en términos de acceso y violaciones de los derechos de nacimiento. Pero sí, esperamos que eso cambie.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Estoy de acuerdo en que ver un aumento en el número de doulas y parteras en la última década suena muy alentador y estoy segura de que ha marcado una gran diferencia en muchas familias, pero hay mucho más por hacer y eso debe cambiar. especialmente en la mentalidad de los que tienen el poder. Porque hay muchas dinámicas de poder que suceden en el escenario del parto, no solo en el escenario del parto, desde el momento en que se enteran, cualquier mujer o persona gestante cuando se enteran de que tienen una prueba de embarazo positiva y están tratando de explorar cuáles son sus opciones para seguir adelante.

La partería y la doula no es algo que se descubra de inmediato si no lo sabe. Algunas personas se enteran muy tarde y se sienten desanimadas y piensan: “¿Por qué no me enteré de esto antes?”. Así que estamos educando desde el principio es una pieza muy importante del rompecabezas allí mismo.

La atención de partería aquí es muy diferente a cómo funciona en otros estados y territorios porque una de las grandes diferencias es que el Departamento de Salud todavía no nos considera profesionales de la salud porque todavía no tenemos licencia aquí. Todavía no tenemos un reglamento. Bueno, no lo tenemos ahora. Solía ​​​​haber uno, y luego se eliminó el lenguaje de partería de esa regulación. Así que ha sido así durante aproximadamente, bueno…

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Desde los años 40.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Desde los años 40, que está a la vuelta de la esquina, el centenario, ¿no?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Trasladó el parto del hogar y el cuidado de la comadrona al hospital. Se borró el lenguaje de las parteras en el Departamento de Salud de Puerto Rico como se borraron las parteras del-

Rebeca Dekker:

Literalmente trataron de borrar a las parteras.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí, pero no ha parado. La profesión ha continuado. La forma en que funciona es que para que las personas accedan a sus laboratorios y ultrasonidos, también necesitan atención médica. Pero idealmente, podría ser un trabajo paralelo donde la partera y el médico puedan discutir y comunicarse entre ellos. Y así lo han podido hacer algunas de las parteras. He podido hacer eso con algunos médicos, pero nuevamente, sólo un puñado de médicos están abiertos a esto. Hay algunas soluciones, que vamos a proponer más adelante, de cómo cambiar esto.

En el estado de Washington, donde estudié y crecí como partera, lo que vi fue muy diferente porque éramos consideradas proveedoras primaria. Tan pronto como la persona supiera que estaba embarazada, automáticamente podría elegir un obstetra o una partera. Y luego, si elegían una partera, todavía tenían tres opciones: una partera en el hospital, una partera en un centro de parto o una partera en el hogar. Así que hay una gran diferencia allí. Definitivamente necesitamos avanzar porque no hay mucha comprensión y muchos de los comentarios agresivos hacia la familia que eligen el cuidado de la partería y los partos en el hogar provienen de proveedores que no tienen toda la información. Así que hay muchos conceptos erróneos, especialmente si los obstetras mayores tienen un concepto erróneo y están enseñando a los obstetras y estudiantes más jóvenes,

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, para recibir cuidado de partería, debe tener un obstetra que esté de acuerdo en brindar la atención de respaldo o paralela, para solicitar pruebas de laboratorio, para ayudarla a obtener un ultrasonido o si necesita algún medicamento durante el embarazo o el parto. Eso limita a las parteras y a las familias porque hay muy pocos médicos que estén de acuerdo en hacer eso. Y luego me imagino que si una cliente necesita ser trasladado al hospital, lo cual sucede, siempre sucederá en algún momento, me imagino que enfrentas una circunstancia difícil cuando lo llevas al hospital. ¿Es eso correcto?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Absolutamente. Especialmente porque incluso si tenemos una buena comunicación con el médico, el médico también es empleado del hospital, por lo que también ocasiona que ocurran muchas cosas. También están oprimidos por el sistema y las dinámicas que están sucediendo allí. Entonces, incluso si un médico sabe, “Oh, estoy transfiriendo a esta cliente porque dice que probó todas las opciones, todas las medidas de comodidad, y está lista para intentar algún medicamento para el dolor, o quiere probar otra cosa”. ¿Incluso si no es una emergencia y es solo una madre estable que quiere otra opción? Si le digo al médico, y el médico sabe, pero llego y el médico todavía no está, ¿entonces cómo accedo al resto del personal que nos va a recibir si ni siquiera contestan el teléfono? Es como empezar de cero.

Y luego cuando documentamos, las Parteras aquí, registramos en el mismo idioma, se usan las mismas siglas para registrar las mismas notas SOAP e incluso notas SOAP más largas. Y tenemos gráficos electrónicos, algunos hacen gráficos en papel, dependiendo. Pero es que… esa es una herramienta muy poderosa que se puede usar para la continuidad del cuidado y la comunicación, porque no hay espacio para pensar que estamos trasladando a una mamá inestable, o si estamos trasladando a alguien que necesita tal vez un proceso de emergencia. , solo evitemos las preguntas de cuántos embarazos ha tenido en el pasado si lo que buscamos es un seguimiento continuo o algo más.

Pero es una herramienta que muchas veces simplemente no es aceptada. No quieren leerlo. Creo que la comunicación es muy poderosa y no tener miedo. He tenido una especie de buenas experiencias simplemente abogando por las familias y manteniéndome fuerte y diciendo mi verdad. “No, este es mi entrenamiento, este es el gráfico, ¿a qué correo electrónico puedo enviarlo?” Y luego, poco a poco, veo que se abren las capas de resistencia, pero toma tiempo y realmente depende de quién nos reciba. Y todavía toma tiempo lejos de la familia. No debería ser como una batalla y una lucha, y es un desafío enorme que, en última instancia, las familias son las que se ven afectadas, ¿no?

Rebeca Dekker:

Bien. Y son ellas las que intentan escapar de un sistema que les da un 50 % de posibilidades de tener una cesárea y también una alta probabilidad de sufrir posibles abusos durante el proceso de parto. Y luego, cuando necesitan esa ayuda médica adicional, estos son los tipos de barreras que enfrentan.

¿Puede hablarnos un poco sobre el impacto que sigue teniendo la colonización en las familias y las trabajadoras de parto en Puerto Rico?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Sí. Bueno, me gustaría explicar un poco sobre nuestro estado, porque no todas las personas saben dónde estamos parados. Puerto Rico, desde 1917, bueno nos convertimos en colonia de los Estados Unidos en 1898 después de la Guerra Hispanoamericana. Fuimos premio de España a los Estados Unidos, y en 1917 le dieron la ciudadanía estadounidense a los puertorriqueños. Cada bebé nacido en Puerto Rico se convirtió en ciudadano estadounidense al mismo tiempo que nuestros hombres fueron enviados a la Primera Guerra Mundial para el Ejército de los Estados Unidos.

La colonización ha limitado la autonomía de nuestra nación. Todo lo que consumimos, alrededor del 85% de lo que consumimos en Puerto Rico es importado a través de los Estados Unidos. A veces, si se trata de un producto o servicio internacional, pagan impuestos dobles debido a esta pérdida, y eso ni siquiera se refiere a la mente colonizada. Lo que Tamara estaba hablando antes sobre la lucha por el poder y esa mentalidad de que no cuestionas la autoridad, tienes que estar sujeto a lo que se impone… es un poco intrínseco a nuestras formas de ser y actuar y aceptar y hacer. Así que eso es un poco de lo que somos. Somos un estado libre asociado de los Estados Unidos, pero lo que somos es una colonia en el siglo XXI.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Somos una democracia con mucha dictadura.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Exactamente. Ya en 2016, el Congreso de los Estados Unidos impuso una junta fiscal a Puerto Rico. Es una junta de siete personas en su mayoría blancas que no son necesariamente puertorriqueñas. No son puertorriqueñas. Creo que tal vez ahora hay un puertorriqueño. Fueron designados, es por una ley que se llama Ley de Supervisión, Administración y Estabilidad Económica de Puerto Rico.

Tamara Trinidad González:

PROMESA.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

PROMESA en español. Por lo que se estableció en 2016 como una junta de supervisión financiera con el fin de reestructurar nuestra deuda y agilizar los procedimientos para aprobar proyectos de infraestructura crítica para combatir la crisis de deuda de Puerto Rico y el gobierno. Pero esa imposición, primero que nada, el pueblo que nos está gobernando no fue elegido por los puertorriqueños, lo impuso el Congreso de los Estados Unidos, y nos va a estar gobernando hasta el 2026. Todavía tenemos nuestro gobernador, todavía tenemos nuestra Cámara de Representantes, el Senado, pero digan lo que digan, si la Junta dice “No, esto no está pasando”, lo anulan.

Este plan de austeridad ha recortado profundamente el presupuesto de servicios públicos de Puerto Rico, incluidos recortes en cuidados de salud, pensiones y educación para pagar el crédito. Así que eso es súper colonial y estamos viendo sus impactos. Esta mañana, le decía a Tamara, que la portada del principal periódico de Puerto Rico, El Nuevo Día, estaba exponiendo que hay una crisis con las NICU en Puerto Rico. Unidad de cuidado intensivo neonatal. Entonces, en el último año, alrededor de cinco NICU han cerrado en Puerto Rico. La crisis de salud ya está aquí. Tenemos la experiencia de que cuando nuestras clientas dan a luz, no pueden encontrar un pediatra para ver a sus bebés tan pronto como deberían ser vistos. El colonialismo realmente nos está afectando en todos los aspectos de nuestras vidas.

Rebeca Dekker:

Correcto, educación, trabajo de salud, qué precios pagas por las cosas, qué control tienes. Y también vale la pena mencionar que supuestamente es democracia, pero no tienes representación en el Congreso de los Estados Unidos. Así que realmente no puedo decir-

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Y tampoco podemos votar por el presidente.

Rebeca Dekker:

Bien. Mencionaste el efecto en las NICU, y sé que cuando hablamos en persona, hablaste sobre la gentrificación. ¿Puedes mencionar eso un poco?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Sí. Hace un par de años, se creó una ley, se crearon un par de leyes para incentivar la inversión estadounidense en Puerto Rico, donde ofrecían a los inversionistas venir a Puerto Rico, invertir, y no tenían que pagar ningún impuesto sobre cualquier ganancia de capital. Entonces, como puede imaginar, muchos inversionistas ricos vienen a Puerto Rico, compran terrenos, compran propiedades, establecen AirBnB y los puertorriqueños no tienen acceso. Hay un problema en cuanto al acceso de hogares. Tengo una amiga que ella, su esposo y sus tres hijos viven en un estudio porque no pueden encontrar una casa asequible.

Y es un problema que está ocurriendo en toda la isla. En las costas donde están las playas, en los centros de la isla, en todas partes. Así que la gentrificación es un problema importante. Estuve leyendo ayer sobre el turismo médico y cómo estas empresas se están estableciendo como un servicio de consejería médica donde una persona rica puede pagar una membresía de digamos $ 5,000 al año y esta empresa le programará citas sin esperar. Entonces yo, que soy puertorriqueña sin acceso económico, si necesito algo, digamos, no sé, cuidado dermatológico, tengo que esperar cinco, seis meses para una cita. Y eso es en todos los servicios. Eso sucede con nosotros, especialmente con los especialistas.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí. Incluso trabajo dental.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Trabajo dental, lo que sea. Lo que sea.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Y también es una crisis ambiental. Amplifica el tema de la salud porque una de nuestras batallas, las batallas ambientales, es el acceso a nuestras playas, que es que el acceso debe ser público según las leyes, pero para la gente rica y los inversionistas ricos, a pesar de que el Departamento de Recursos Naturales están otorgando permisos, porque pueden pagar más por los permisos y pueden construir en el…

Tania Silva Meléndez:

vallas y…

Tamara Trinidad González:

E incluso en la zona marítimo terrestre, prohibiendo el acceso a las personas locales y simplemente creando otros problemas también. Hay muchas maneras en que el colonialismo nos está afectando. Y es solo una cadena, una reacción en cadena que seguimos viendo desarrollarse ante nuestra vista porque incluso si estamos involucradas en el trabajo de parto y nacimiento, también somos conscientes de todo lo demás. Porque nuevamente, el trabajo de nacimiento es salud pública y también es mucho trabajo político.

Rebeca Dekker:

Y también están tratando de vivir y criar a sus familias.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Si, exacto. La crisis.

Tamara Trinidad González:

El día a día.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Las luchas.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí. Es como, y están sucediendo muchas cosas y se siente, podemos sentir la pesadez. Y realmente, creo que nos duele mucho cuando vemos cómo las familias se ven afectadas por todo esto. Sentimos frustración cuando vemos una familia que finalmente pasó por todos los cursos y la educación, pero al final del día, no pudo abogar por sí misma en el hospital. Porque todos los años de colonialismo los han impactado de tal manera que algunos lo son, simplemente tienen tantas intersecciones que les han oprimido, que es muy difícil. Poder ir con ellos a los hospitales como segundo acompañante es muy importante porque hasta la pandemia se usó como excusa para quitarles ese derecho a las familias.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Todavía lo es. Todo está abierto, todo está-

Rebeca Dekker:

Bien. Nadie lleva máscaras, sí. Está abierto. Excepto que todavía están limitando el apoyo en el trabajo de parto y el parto.

Y también quiero decir que me impactaron mucho unos videos de una periodista en Puerto Rico llamada Bianca Graulau.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Graulau, ajá.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sí. Algunos videos asombrosos sobre la gentrificación y realmente sobre el terreno reportando eso es increíble. Así que ánimo a la gente a ver su trabajo y lo vincularemos en las notas del programa.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Iba a decir que creo que uno de los videos que hizo era sobre lo que está pasando en Hawai, y ahí es donde vamos. Hacia allá va Puerto Rico. La gente no puede permitirse casas. La gente vive en tiendas de campaña. Es terrible. Es terrible.

Rebeca Dekker:

¿Cuáles son algunas de las soluciones que ha intentado implementar, o que la comunidad de partos ha intentado implementar que parecen estar ayudando a las familias?

Tamara Trinidad González:

¡Curso de Evidence Based Birth!

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Ese es uno. Desafortunadamente, no podemos esperar que el gobierno, ni el departamento de salud, ni las autoridades estén obligadas a tomar estos asuntos en sus manos. No podemos esperar por ellos. Ha sido, en mi experiencia, he estado haciendo este trabajo durante 13, 14 años, y los cambios son tan lentos, y cuando algo comienza a cambiar, luego la pandemia, todo retrocede. Creo que la única esperanza en este momento en la que realmente puedo confiar es el trabajo comunitario. Y es lo que ha marcado la diferencia para algunas familias.

Soy coordinadora general de una organización sin fines de lucro que se llama Caderamen, y tiene un programa, un programa de servicios que se llama SePARE, que ofrecen servicios de educación y doula, servicios de partería y servicios de medicina naturista, trabajadores sociales, salud mental. Hemos visto en comparación con los números que mencionamos, los resultados en Puerto Rico, vemos cómo estos servicios de apoyo e interdisciplinarios para las familias realmente marcan la diferencia en los resultados de salud y en la experiencia de esta familia. Yo diría que lo que se necesita es más trabajo desde el suelo. Necesitamos unirnos y ver como de comunidad en comunidad podemos apoyar a las familias porque parece que no es una prioridad de nuestro gobierno.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Esta es Tamara por aquí. Quería agregar a eso. Absolutamente trabajo comunitario, es un camino a seguir. Y la fuerza en la que la comunidad está depositando la confianza porque se sienten respetadas, se sienten escuchadas y están aprendiendo.

Las redes sociales y ese auge también son una gran herramienta para que las personas de las generaciones más jóvenes, tal vez no lean un artículo muy largo, sino material educativo que es muy dinámico, se sienten muy atraídos por eso y es más fácil verse a sí mismos y ver. , “Oh, estas familias de Puerto Rico están accediendo a este tipo de salud”. Ya sea partos en el hogar o incluso podrían ver imágenes de partos en hospitales donde pueden moverse libremente y tienen apoyo y hay otras cosas sucediendo. Así que somos muy visuales, así que eso también ayuda.

Y otra cosa que ha estado en conversación recientemente es unir fuerzas de diferentes organizaciones y profesionales y poner la situación en el centro, el problema en el centro para ver cómo podemos encontrar soluciones desde todos los diferentes recursos y perspectivas. Avanzar hacia la integración o algún tipo de coalición, sólo ayudarnos a ser más fuertes en la búsqueda de soluciones, podría seguir marcando una gran diferencia.

Todas las parteras tienen muy claro que estamos listas para crear una licencia de partería en Puerto Rico, y estamos analizando las formas en cómo se vería eso. Puede centrarse en el derecho de las parteras a trabajar en nuestro ámbito de práctica y cómo nos han formado y cómo nos valoran en otras partes del mundo, pero también debe respetar los derechos de la familia a elegir.

Rebeca Dekker:

Bien.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Otra cosa es que los viejos obstetras, su mentalidad es difícil de cambiar. Entonces, cuando les hablábamos en enero aquí en Puerto Rico, vemos que parte de la solución es trabajar con las generaciones más jóvenes, con los médicos que se están formando en este momento para que nuestra esperanza, las personas que realmente quieren marcar la diferencia en los partos y nacimientos en Puerto Rico.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, el trabajo preliminar de la comunidad y el aumento del número de doulas y parteras y luego encontrar la unidad son soluciones en las que se está trabajando. Y ustedes me mencionaron cuando nos conocimos en persona que hubo algún éxito legislativo reciente. Sé que tienes dudas sobre el gobierno, pero… cuéntaselo a nuestros oyentes.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Sí. Primero, es importante que el Tribunal Supremo de Puerto Rico haya fallado en un caso de violencia obstétrica donde murió un bebé [Flores v. Ryder Hospital]. En resumen, este médico indujo a una madre con 36 semanas porque se iba de vacaciones en su fecha de parto. El bebé, por supuesto, nació prematuro con muchas complicaciones y 12 días después murió. Entonces la familia demandó, la Corte Suprema dictaminó que tanto el médico como el hospital eran responsables de la muerte del bebé. Es la primera vez que la Corte Suprema o alguna autoridad judicial habla de violencia obstétrica y llama a esa acción por su nombre.

En América Latina, algunos otros países ya cuentan con legislación sobre violencia obstétrica. Aquí en Puerto Rico hay un proyecto de ley del Senado, 454, que fue propuesto en junio de 2021. El Senado lo aprobó, pero aún está en la Cámara para ser aprobado. Así que veremos qué pasa con eso. Es importante que este tipo de conductas se nombren desde el gobierno y se proponga algo para tratar este tema de violencia de género.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Bueno. Tamara aquí. Otro acierto legislativo es que en febrero de 2021, por esa fecha, un poco antes, se propuso un proyecto de ley en el Senado para declarar el 5 de mayo de cada año, que se celebra en todo el mundo como el Día Internacional de la Partera, entonces se propuso declarar una ley en Puerto Rico que en todas las esferas del gobierno, incluido el Departamento de Educación y el Departamento de Salud y también en la comunidad, deben saber sobre el Día de la Partería. Tan reciente como enero de este año, y creo que fue como unos días antes de que llegaras a Puerto Rico de visita, finalmente se declaró una ley. Así que pasó por todos los pasos del gobierno para finalmente convertirse en ley.

Y aunque ha sido conocido durante décadas por la Organización Mundial de la Salud y las Naciones Unidas, es muy importante que ahora sea una ley aquí y creemos que esto solo abrirá un espacio para continuar educando a las comunidades. Esperamos que esta ley sea solo un paso adelante y un eslabón para que finalmente se reconozca el cuidado de partería en Puerto Rico y se reincorpore a los servicios de salud. Y para celebrar este año, ya estamos planificando una actividad en la plaza pública de Río Grande, que es uno de nuestros municipios. Y ese alcalde acaba de ofrecer la plaza libre de costo y está ofreciendo mucho apoyo para que podamos recibir a todo el público y hablar sobre la historia de la partería y tener artesanos y tener música y simplemente hacer una fiesta pública en el pueblo.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Celebración, sí.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Una celebración y solo seguir creando conciencia.

Rebeca Dekker:

Y eso era lo que estaba pensando… Obviamente la sentencia de violencia obstétrica es muy importante, como mencionan.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Sí, porque tal vez los hospitales sean más conscientes de que realmente tienen que hacer algo al respecto. No es sólo culpa del médico. Tienes que tener protocolos, tienes que supervisar cómo funcionan las cosas, que estás siguiendo pautas, etcétera, etcétera.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sí, y el hecho de que mencionaron la violencia obstétrica y hablaron sobre ella, y luego, en un lapso de tiempo similar, también nombraron a las parteras como una solución y requirieron educación básicamente para honrar a las parteras es un paso importante para seguir adelante. Y sé que ambos están mirando y trabajando hacia la legislación futura también, para que las parteras puedan practicar con eso.

Sé que es un tema difícil porque en algunos lugares, las parteras no necesariamente quieren regulación, pero si tampoco eres reconocida como proveedora legítima, es muy difícil que obtengas recursos, acceso, respeto.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Y también lo hace más difícil para las familias, porque no todos pueden permitirse un parto en casa.

Rebeca Dekker:

Bien. Si pudiera ser reconocido como proveedoras de cuidado de salud, también habría otras formas de pagar por sus servicios. Sí.

¿Qué otras metas tienen para el futuro o algún proyecto por venir?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Me encantaría este año que podamos ir a hospitales y universidades y simplemente hablar con profesionales, con personas que ya son profesionales en el ámbito del parto y con profesionales que recién se están desarrollando, los que están en el útero de su formación. 

Rebeca Dekker:

[Risas] Los profesionales de bebés o trabajadores de la salud.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí.

Rebeca Dekker:

Sí. Entonces, ¿cuáles eran tus planes? Hablaste de eso en persona. Entonces, ¿qué estás planificando  este año para eso?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Nos hemos comunicado con personas que conocemos, otros profesionales que conocemos que son profesores en universidades. Hay dos profesionales, una es médico de familia y la otra es enfermera. Es enfermera partera, pero enseña específicamente a estudiantes de enfermería general en una universidad. Estamos llamando a sus puertas porque también tienen las personas que necesitan para pedir que eso suceda.

Pero absolutamente hay que encontrar formas, y estuve en Colombia la semana pasada y hablé con parteras tradicionales y cómo colaboran tan bien con las obstetras femeninas y otros profesionales de salud mental perinatal, y crearon un plan de estudios que se presentó a una universidad para la educación continua. Y me enamoré de esa idea. Simplemente lo veo completamente posible, y puede ser una forma de hacerlo más estructurado y también incentivar la capacitación adicional.

Rebeca Dekker:

Tania, ¿y tú? ¿Qué proyectos tienes en mente este año?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Hablamos de esto, de capacitar profesionales el pasado mes de febrero en Caderamen Health Birth Summit y aquí en Puerto Rico. Y algunos de los disertantes fueron profesores de los estudiantes de medicina y de la residencia de obstetricia. Entonces, esta doctora, después de que estuvimos en el mismo panel y después de la presentación, vino a verme y al menos me dijo que está muy interesada en trabajar juntas. Entonces ese es otro camino de entrada para poder acceder a la facultad de medicina de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, que es una de las facultades de medicina más importantes de Puerto Rico. Y esperamos poder arreglar algo con ella para que podamos llegar a los estudiantes y también a ellos. Entonces eso en términos de educación y hacer algo dentro del sistema.

Personalmente, supongo, bueno, seguir haciendo el trabajo que estamos haciendo y evitar el agotamiento porque este es un trabajo que consume mucho.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Quería agregar a eso. Gracias por mencionar eso. Eso es muy importante mientras seguimos sintiendo el estrés en nuestro cuerpo. Pero quería agregar, en parte de educar, recuerdo cuando era estudiante de partería, uno de los proyectos de tesis que me enamoró vino de una estudiante de partería que solía ser EMT antes de convertirse en partera, en esa misma comunidad donde estaba la universidad. Así que fue muy sorprendente ver cómo era ella, simplemente tenía una relación increíble con los técnicos de emergencias médicas. Entonces pudo presentar un plan de estudios porque pudo hablar con los técnicos de emergencias médicas y decirles y preguntarles: “Entonces, cuando las parteras te llaman para una transferencia, ¿qué preguntas tienes?” Con toda esa conversación, se pudo armar un plan de estudios hermoso y muy poderoso. Entonces, después de eso, pudieron ir a cada unidad de EMT y simplemente enseñarles lo que sucede cuando te llama una partera. En un centro de partp o en un parto en el hogar, ¿qué necesitamos? Y eso fue muy poderoso porque se implementó unos años antes de que terminara mi programa y lo que vi, y para las parteras, fue como, oh, estamos viendo el cambio. Pero me impresionó completamente esto, que si llamamos al 911 y llegaron los técnicos de emergencias médicas, fue un momento muy humilde de ¿qué necesitas? Eran las preguntas específicas para que no se convirtiera en una batalla. Fue como, oh, no, querían ayudar y querían hacer exactamente lo que necesitábamos para que no se perdiera tiempo en el momento.

Así que aquí tenemos que hacer mucho trabajo porque cuando necesitamos una transferencia por diferentes razones, cosas simples como cuál es el nivel de oxígeno que se necesita poner se convierte en un desacuerdo. Y eso es sensible al tiempo. Eso es cuestión de vida. U otras destrezas que necesitan ser realizadas. Entonces, creo que armar un currículo de estudios que también se pueda reunir y ayudar a los técnicos de emergencias médicas y verlos como parte del equipo y honrar sus habilidades, pero ayudarlos a comprender nuestras perspectivas y que podamos comprender sus perspectivas y sus luchas también. , podría ser muy poderoso.

Rebeca Dekker:

Me encanta cómo ambas tienen una pasión por unir a las personas. Es una cosa que he visto, ustedes trabajan juntas, se sostienen y se apoyan unas a otras, y traen a otras trabajadoras de parto y tienen pasión por traer estudiantes y técnicos de emergencias médicas y familias y todos los que trabajan hacia un objetivo común. Así que es muy hermoso.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Gracias.

Tamara Trinidad González:

No hay otra manera.

Rebeca Dekker:

Entonces, ¿cómo pueden las personas apoyar y seguir su trabajo para nuestros oyentes que se ven afectados por su conversación?

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Bueno, quería invitar a los oyentes a ver SePARE, o SePARE, estamos en los diferentes Facebook, Twitter e Instagram. SePARE, nos puede visitar y seguir nuestro trabajo desde la organización con la que trabajo, porque aunque todavía tengo mis clientes privados, la organización ocupa la mayor parte de mi tiempo, por lo que me dedico principalmente a eso. También puedes seguir a la Asociación de Parteras de Puerto Rico (@asociaciondeparteraspr). ¿Quieres contar más, Tamara?

Tamara Trinidad González:

Sí. Vamos a enviar estos enlaces para que sean más fáciles de enlazar. Pero sí, la Asociación de Parteras de Puerto Rico, aunque también tengo mi práctica privada, soy actualmente la presidenta de la Asociación, y es un espacio que estamos organizando para amplificar las voces y los derechos de las parteras y las familias. Publicaremos muchas actualizaciones en los próximos meses sobre cómo apoyar el trabajo de la partería y cómo avanzar la profesión.

Esto también incluye que necesitamos mucha recaudación de fondos porque habrá muchos servicios que necesitaremos contratar para hacer el trabajo que se debe hacer. Entonces diría que siga revisando las páginas para que pueda encontrar todas las actualizaciones y también puede enviarnos un correo electrónico a appr2021@gmail.com.

Rebeca Dekker:

Y nos aseguraremos de tener todos los enlaces en los que sea fácil hacer clic, todo lo que nos envíe y que quiera que compartamos. Tania y Tamara, muchas gracias por venir al podcast. Gracias por todo lo que están haciendo en Puerto Rico, los honramos y apreciamos a ambos.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Gracias.

Tamara Trinidad González:

Muchas gracias por todo el trabajo que también has estado haciendo, porque has estado allanando el camino para todas y todos en diversas partes del mundo, y eso es muy importante y necesario.

Rebeca Dekker:

Lo estamos haciendo juntas.

Tania Silva Meléndez:

Si, absolutamente.

Rebeca Dekker:

Gracias a todos y todas por escuchar este episodio tan importante con Tania y Tamara. Si tiene interés en unirse a ellas y ofrecer su tiempo o habilidades como voluntaria para ayudarles a reformar el sistema de salud materna en Puerto Rico, actualmente están buscando voluntarias con experiencia en leyes, relaciones públicas, financiamiento, recopilación de datos, investigación y redacción. O si tiene recursos o acceso a conexiones que podrían ayudar a financiar su trabajo, envíe un correo electrónico puertoricobirthrights@gmail.com. Además, si gran parte de esta información era nueva para usted, le recomiendo que consulte uno o dos libros de su biblioteca local sobre la historia de Puerto Rico o de la colonización estadounidense. Dos libros introductorios que recomiendo incluyen “Cómo ocultar un imperio” de Daniel Immerwahr y “Puerto Rico: lo que todos deben saber” de Jorge Duany. 

El podcast de hoy fue presentado por la membresía profesional de Evidence Based Birth. Los artículos y podcasts gratuitos que proporcionamos al público cuentan con el respaldo de nuestro programa de membresía profesional en Evidence Based Birth. Nuestros miembros son profesionales en el campo del parto que están comprometidos a ser agentes de cambio en su comunidad.

Listening to this podcast is an Australian College of Midwives CPD Recognised Activity.

Stay empowered, read more :

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This